Energy and the New Congress | Part 1

There’s no doubt that the 2015 GOP ascendency in the Senate will affect the country’s energy policy. Inside Energy takes a comprehensive look at what the 114th Congress could mean for Keystone XL, EPA regulations, energy efficiency standards and renewable energy generation.

Here are two stories from Inside Energy exploring these topics.

Energy Efficiency May Be Bipartisan Winner

The National Renewable Energy Laboratory in Golden, Colorado is the country's largest net-zero energy building. The duct-work is in the floor, unlike in most buildings, where it's in the ceilings.

Anna Boiko-Weyrauch / Rocky Mountain PBS I-News

The National Renewable Energy Laboratory in Golden, Colorado is the country\’s largest net-zero energy building. The duct-work is in the floor, unlike in most buildings, where it\’s in the ceilings.

When it comes to U.S. energy consumption, transportation and power plants leap to mind as top power users. Buildings, though, are not far behind. Commercial buildings account for one-fifth of our energy use.

Much of that is pure waste, leaking from poorly-insulated walls or lights left on when no one is around. Energy efficiency is one of the few issues with support from both Republicans and Democrats, as well as private industry. In the new GOP-controlled Congress, the timing for energy efficiency legislation may finally be right.

Read the rest of Jordan Wirfs-Brock’s report at InsideEnergy.org


Who Cares About Keystone XL?

For the past three years, the Keystone XL pipeline has sat in this field in southwestern North Dakota.

Andrew Cullen / Special to Inside Energy

For the past three years, the Keystone XL pipeline has sat in this field in southwestern North Dakota.

One of the first things the Republican majority in the Senate will take up when the new Congress convenes is a bill to approve Keystone XL. That’s the controversial pipeline owned by TransCanada that would transport Canadian tar sands crude to refineries on the Gulf Coast, picking up oil from North Dakota along the way. But in the six years the pipeline has been delayed, some oil companies have moved on. So why is it still so popular with Republicans?

Read more of Emily Guerin’s story at Inside Energy.


Check back Monday for more of this project.

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